Maryland Behavioral Health

About Us

MDBehavioralHealth.com is an online training site hosted by the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Developed in partnership with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Mental Hygiene Administration, the site provides training to individuals interested in supporting the behavioral health of youth and their families.

Sharon Stephans, PhD

Dr. Sharon Hoover Stephan directs MDBehavioralHealth.com training and activities. Dr. Stephan is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Co-director of the Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She specializes in the implementation of evidence-based interventions by behavioral health and primary care providers. Dr. Stephan is especially interested in interventions for trauma-exposed youth. She has led and collaborated on multiple federally- and state-funded grants, with a commitment to the study and quality of children's mental health services and school mental health (SMH).

Larraine Berstein

Larraine Bernstein coordinates MDBehavioralhealth.com activities. Ms. Bernstein is a policy analyst in the Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She is responsible for managing day-to-day operations of grant programs focused on prevention and early intervention related to psychological distress in youth and young adults and treatment for adolescents and young adults with substance use and co-occurring mental health disorders.

 

MDBehavioralHealth.com training is provided by faculty at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, as well as several partners from Maryland and around the country with expertise in youth behavioral health.

  • Youth Co-Occurring Disorders Training for Behavioral Health Providers

    Dr. Kimberly Becker PhD Dr. Becker is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a licensed psychologist in the State of Maryland. Dr. Becker received a bachelor's degree in psychology from the College of William & Mary. She then completed her doctorate in psychology at the University of Arizona, a respecialization certificate in clinical psychology at the University of Hawaii, and postdoctoral fellowships at the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Becker's clinical experience and research have focused on improving the effectiveness of evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions for children, adolescents, and families through innovations in professional development. Through this work, Dr. Becker has collaborated with mental health providers, educators, and paraprofessionals to increase youth and family participation in services and enhance service quality across a variety of settings.

    Dana Cunningham PhD Dr. Cunningham graduated from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale with a doctoral degree in clinical psychology. Following the completion of her internship at the University of Maryland Medical System/Maryland Veterans Administration Consortium, she completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for School Mental Health. In 2006, she joined the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Cunningham is the Director of the Prince George's School Mental Health Initiative (PGSMHI). The PGSMHI is designed to provide intensive school-based counseling and support services to students in special education. Dr. Cunningham's research interests include resilience, family engagement, and empirically supported treatment for ethnic minority youth.

    Carlo DiClemente PhD Dr. DiClemente is a professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He is the Director of the HABITS Lab, which is dedicated to understanding and examining health behaviors such as smoking, drug addiction, alcoholism, exercise, and eating behaviors. Dr. DiClemente was recently selected as a recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Addictive Behaviors Special Interest Group (AB-SIG) of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT). Current research projects include assessing the process of smoking initiation and cessation, Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training in medical residency programs, motivation and stages of change for a variety of health behaviors, and understanding mechanism of change in alcohol and substance abuse.

    Marc Fishman MD Dr. Fishman is an addiction psychiatrist and a member of the faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He leads Maryland Treatment Centers, a regional behavioral healthcare provider, which includes Mountain Manor Treatment Center in Baltimore, MD for adolescents and young adults, Mountain Manor Treatment Center in Emmitsburg, MD for adults, as well as several other inpatient and outpatient programs. In that role he has been involved in development and implementation of innovative programming in addiction and co-occurring disorder treatment. He is a national expert on youth addiction treatment and treatment matching. His academic work has focused on models of care and treatment outcomes for addictions in youth, in particular opioid dependence. He is a past President of the Maryland Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Shannon Garrett LGSW, CSC-AD Mr. Garrett is a licensed social worker and a certified substance abuse counselor. He has been employed with Mountain Manor Treatment Center for over 20 years and is currently the Program Director for the inpatient co-occurring unit that treats adolescents and young adults. He has been a field instructor for the University of Maryland’s School of Social Work since 1997, and enjoys disseminating the use of clinical interventions through engaging lectures on a variety of topics including motivational interviewing.

    Diane Grieder Ms. Grieder is the owner of AliPar, Inc., a behavioral health consulting firm committed to improving organizational performance. Her areas of expertise include performing clinical audits and medical records review, developing curricula and delivering training and technical assistance on person-centered treatment planning, in-depth knowledge about CARF accreditation and co-occurring and substance abuse disorders, and advising about creating quality improvement systems, operational efficiency, and effectiveness. Ms. Grieder is a co-author of Treatment Planning for Person-Centered Care: The Road to Mental Health and Addiction Recovery, a textbook with Elsevier/Academic Press published in late 2004 and revised as a second edition in 2013, and is also a co-author of a chapter in the Handbook of Community Psychiatry, “Collaborative Person-Centered Planning,” published by Springer in 2012.

    Lauren Grimes Ms. Grimes is currently the Transitional Age Youth Outreach Coordinator for On Our Own of Maryland, the Statewide Consumer/Peer Network. She has a bachelor's degree in English Literature and International Relations from McDaniel College. Lauren has struggled with and overcome numerous behavioral health challenges since she was a young adolescent, and has extensive personal experience with the mental health system which she freely draws from in her work in the peer world. As a young adult she has worked and volunteered with youth and adults involved in the behavioral health system, as well as youth in the foster care, child welfare and juvenile justice systems. She works extensively within the field of peer support and youth-led systems change on county, state, and national levels, aiding organizations in incorporating the youth voice into their policy and operations, and helping young adults to create an equitable and reciprocal relationship with their service systems. She is a trained WRAP and Anti-Stigma Project Facilitator, a YouthMOVE National consultant, and she currently stands on boards/committees including YouthMOVE National Board of Directors, OOOMD's Public Policy in Mental Health Committee and the Anti-Stigma Project, Maryland Coalition for Families Young Adult Council, MHA's MD Peer Support Certification Workgroup, and several others as a young adult consumer advocate.

    Christine Higgins Christine Higgins is a trainer for the University of Maryland, Department of Psychiatry, Evidence Based Practice Center. She currently serves as consultant to the Collaborative for Homeless Enhancement Services (CHES) grant in Anne Arundel and Carroll counties. She is qualified to train on person centered care planning, Critical Time Intervention (CTI), the Daily Living Assessment (DLA), and motivational interviewing.

    Brandon Johnson MHS Brandon J. Johnson works at the Behavioral Health Administration on various suicide and violence prevention efforts. As the director of suicide and violence prevention, he oversees the Maryland Crisis Hotline, is the lead staff person on the Governor's Commission on Suicide Prevention, as well as the grant manager for the MD-SPIN SAMHSA suicide prevention grant. Brandon also serves as the DHMH representative on the Maryland Human Trafficking Task Force. He graduated from Morgan State University in 2008 with a bachelor's degree in psychology and received a master's degree in health science from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2012, with a concentration in mental health. He also earned a graduate certificate in health education from Johns Hopkins. Brandon is currently working on obtaining a doctorate in public health (DrPH) degree at Morgan State University.

    Shauna King MEd Shauna King is a school culture and climate specialist for Montgomery County Public Schools. She is a former school principal, peer mediation teacher, classroom teacher, intervention specialist, and Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS) coordinator. She is a graduate course instructor for Gratz College of Pennsylvania and teaches courses in Cooperative Discipline and Personality Styles in Children. As executive director of her own professional development organization, King Professional Development Services, Mrs. King has worked with educators across ten states. Her focus is to help schools to create safe and orderly environments for students and teachers. Mrs. King is a National Cooperative Discipline® facilitator as well as a certified presenter for The Upside Down Organization of Baltimore. She regularly presents on topics including PBIS, classroom management, motivating student behavior, bullying prevention, parenting skills, executive function skills, and gender differences.

    Michael Lindsey PhD, MPH Dr. Lindsey’s expertise is in the areas of mental health service delivery to depressed African American youth, school mental health services research and practice, in-home service delivery to youth with serious emotional disturbance (SED) and their families, and social network influences on child and adolescent mental health services use.

    Catherine McAlpine PhD, LCSW-C Dr. McAlpine is a licensed social worker and the manager for Behavioral Health and Crisis Services at the Department of Health and Human Services in Montgomery County. She is also an approved trainer for the Recovery Coach Academy, an approved trainer and facilitator of the relapse prevention curriculum “Sexual Health In Recovery,” and an Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration (ADAA) approved trainer for the Recovery Oriented System of Care (ROSC).

    Jean McCracken Ms. McCracken is a certified alcohol and drug abuse counselor. She currently is a Substance Abuse Liaison for Anne Arundel County Public Schools and an Addiction Specialist with Arundel Psychological Associates. Ms. McCracken has more than 25 years' experience working with adolescents and their families. She has held positions as an Adolescent Specialist with the Safe & Drug Free Schools Project; Anne Arundel County Health Department; and as an advocate for youth with the Anne Arundel County Foster Care Review Board and Board of Directors for Harundale Youth Services.

    David R. McDuff MD Dr. McDuff is a nationally known addiction psychiatrist and founding Director of the Addiction Psychiatry and Medicine Fellowship programs at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He is the long-time sports psychiatrist of the Baltimore Orioles and Ravens, and author of the book Sports Psychiatry: Strategies for Life Balance and Peak Performance. He specializes in the treatment of mood, anxiety, attention, trauma, and addictive disorders and has an active practice in sports psychiatry providing performance enhancement training to athletes at all competitive levels. Dr. McDuff holds faculty appointments at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore and the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda. He has been selected by Baltimore Magazine three times as the Top Doc in Addiction Psychiatry. He is an active teacher and writer who has given more than 100 lectures at national and international conferences and published fifty journal articles, book chapters and reviews, manuals, and monographs.

    Meka McNeal Ms. McNeal is the statewide Evidence-Based Practice in Supported Employment (EBPSE) Consultant and Trainer for the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Evidence-Based Practice Center. Ms. McNeal's Supported Employment career began in 1998 as an Employment Specialist in Atlanta, GA, and in 2000 she became the coordinator for a supported employment program in New Carrollton, MD. Her role as the statewide trainer began in 2004. Ms. McNeal trains, provides technical assistance and monitors Supported Employment Programs in Maryland for how to implement EBPSE, and she provides training and technical assistance to other states around the country that are moving forward with their supported employment efforts.

    Gloria M. Reeves PhD Dr. Reeves is an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, specializing in family therapy interventions, attachment issues, complex psychiatric comorbidity, and trauma related disorders. Dr. Reeves’ research interests include childhood aggression, polypharmacy issues in child psychiatry, youth violence prevention, and neuroimaging. She completed the Sheppard Pratt Psychiatry Residency and Child Fellowship Training at University of Maryland at Baltimore. Her awards include a Ginsburg Fellowship, a Clarence Shultz Award, and a Eugene Brody Award.

    Carl Robertson MRE, MDiv Mr. Robertson is the Prevention Manager at the Maryland Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling. He has dedicated his career to the problem gambling prevention field with an emphasis on youth problem gambling prevention. He has presented several times at the National Council on Problem Gambling Annual Conference on topics such as Youth Prevention Programs and Spirituality in Gambling Treatment. Mr. Robertson also conducts public awareness and education training to numerous professional and community advocates regarding the prevalence of adult and adolescent problem gambling in Maryland. He offers a unique adolescent problem gambling prevention program for youth called Smart Choices. Mr. Robertson conducts trainings for student assistance, prevention specialists, and mental health and addiction professionals. He also provides trainings on the family and financial aspects of problem gambling to behavioral health care providers.

    Jason Schiffman PhD Dr. Schiffman is a professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County where he runs the Youth First Lab dedicated to producing meaningful and useful research in the context of providing clinical services, while at the same time training future leaders in psychology. His areas of research include early identification and treatment of youth at risk for psychosis and reduction of stigma against people with serious mental health concerns. Dr. Shiffman’s research seeks to understand the origins of, and treatment for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders in children and young adults.

    Joan Smith MSW, LCSW Ms. Smith has been a social worker for 40 years and has worked in the Child and Adolescent Division of the Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) for close to 30 years. Her primary areas of interest and expertise are in promoting outcomes for improving the positive mental health and well-being of children and families across Maryland, resource and policy development, and macro social work, and she is an advocate for addressing the needs of rural areas. Since 2006, she has led the efforts at BHA on resilience, particularly as it relates to child and family services. More recently, the Resilience Committee, which Ms. Smith chairs, has expanded its work across the lifespan and the continuum of care, (promotion through treatment and aftercare), while also demonstrating how the same core skills and competencies for increasing wellness and resilience can be applied to communities, organizations, and public health as well. It is the recognition that people and communities have the ongoing capacity, even with histories of trauma and adversity, to recognize and/or develop the skills they will need to live lives of purpose, compassion, and well-being, that guides the commitment Ms. Smith and many others have, for the resilience work being done in Maryland.

    Sharon Hoover Stephan PhD Dr. Stephan is an associate professor of psychiatry as well as the co-director of the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The mission of the CSMH is to “Strengthen policies and programs in school mental health to improve learning and promote success for America’s youth.” To achieve that goal, the center supports research, disseminates policy information, provides training, and works to integrate the efforts of schools, researchers, community organizations, and government organizations to improve awareness of mental health issues. Dr. Stephan is experienced in establishing empirically supported intervention in schools, and she has a particular interest in interventions targeted at youth who have experienced traumatic events. She leads and participates in a variety of state- and federally-funded research projects aimed at assessing and improving school mental health services. Dr. Stephan is a national trainer for SSET and CBITS.

    Jane Walker Ms. Walker has spent years working in partnership with health professionals, legislators, businesses, and families to help children and families of children with mental health concerns receive necessary treatment, as well as reduce the strain families face when trying to navigate the mental health system.

    Christopher Welsh MD Dr. Welsh's main areas of clinical work are addiction and dual diagnosis. He works in various in- and out-patient settings, including methadone and buprenorphine maintenance. He also has an interest in the medical complications of addiction and is the medical director of the UMMC Substance Abuse Consultation Service, which is responsible for substance abuse assessment and intervention with patients throughout the University of Maryland Medical Center. He has also worked with the Baltimore City Department of Health and the State DHMH on needle exchange, opioid overdose prevention, and substance use in pregnancy projects. Additionally, Dr. Welsh serves as the Medical Director of the State Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling.

    Kristen Wright MS, LCPC Kris Wright joined Maryland Healthy Transitions as its Project Director in April 2015. She previously worked for eight years in supported employment and psychiatric rehabilitation at an outpatient mental health center, most recently as a program manager overseeing employment and PRP services for youths with emotional and behavioral disorders and adults with serious behavioral health conditions. Her efforts focus on improving outcomes by implementing evidence based practices through person centered interventions. She completed her master's degree in clinical psychology on a research track at Loyola University, and is a practicing therapist licensed as a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) and an Approved Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor Supervisor in Maryland.

    Albert Zachik MD Dr. Zachik is the Director of the Office of Child and Adolescent Services in the Mental Hygiene Administration, Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. He is a child and adolescent psychiatrist and a member of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's Workgroup on Community Systems of Care. He is also a member of the clinical faculty in psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Georgetown University School of Medicine. Dr. Zachik has a special interest in developing a full system of care in Maryland for children and adolescents with mental health needs that integrates mental health services into all existing programs for youth, including schools and early childhood, juvenile services, and social services programs.

  • Maryland Early Intervention Program (EIP)

    Dr. Melanie Bennett PhD Melanie Bennett leads the Training and Implementation Support Services initiatives of the Maryland EIP Program. She is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Bennett's research is focused on the treatment of alcohol, drug, and nicotine dependence in people with schizophrenia and other forms of severe mental illness.

    Manda Brooks MSW, LCSW-C Manda Brooks is the team leader for the RAISE Connection Program, a coordinated specialty care program created as a part of the Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode Implementation and Evaluation Study (RAISE-IES). Ms. Brooks's background includes providing mental health services to children and adolescents.

    Robert W. Buchanan MD Dr. Buchanan directs the Maryland EIP Program. He is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and interim Director of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, a division of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Buchanan's research interests span from the neurobehavioral and neuroanatomical investigation of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia to the investigation of novel pharmacological approaches for the treatment of cognitive impairments, negative symptoms, and treatment-resistant positive symptoms in people with schizophrenia.

    Dr. Howard Goldman MD, PhD Howard Goldman is the Director of the Mental Health Systems Collaborative of the Maryland EIP Program. He is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Director of the Network on Mental Health Policy Research. Dr. Goldman's expertise is in evaluating mental health services and financing programs and policies.

    Bentley Greber MSW Ms. Greber is the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Specialist of the RAISE Connection Program, where she assists clients in reaching their goals related to employment and education. Her position with the RAISE Connection Program includes providing assistance with obtaining and maintaining jobs, providing support and advocacy in high school programs, assisting clients with school applications, and providing support within college, graduate programs, GED preparation programs, and vocational/technical programs. Ms. Greber completed her MSW from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, with a concentration in Clinical-Mental Health Social Work. She completed her internships at the Regional Institute for Children and Adolescents (RICA-Baltimore) and at a Home-Based Residential Treatment Program at St. Vincent’s Villa. Prior to working with the RAISE Connection Program and attending graduate school, Ms. Greber worked as a Community Employment Specialist at Way Station, Inc. in Howard County.

    Diane Grieder Ms. Grieder is the owner of AliPar, Inc., a behavioral health consulting firm committed to improving organizational performance. Her areas of expertise include performing clinical audits and medical records review, developing curricula and delivering training and technical assistance on person-centered treatment planning, in-depth knowledge about CARF accreditation and co-occurring and substance abuse disorders, and advising about creating quality improvement systems, operational efficiency, and effectiveness. Ms. Grieder is a co-author of Treatment Planning for Person-Centered Care: The Road to Mental Health and Addiction Recovery, a textbook with Elsevier/Academic Press published in late 2004 and revised as a second edition in 2013, and is also a co-author of a chapter in the Handbook of Community Psychiatry, “Collaborative Person-Centered Planning,” published by Springer in 2012.

    Darcy Gruttadaro JD Darcy Gruttadaro coordinates advocacy, support, and policy activity for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). She works to create more effective systems of care to serve the mental health needs of youth, young adults, and families. She has developed resources on major policy issues including the importance of evidence-based practices and improving the quality of mental health care; integrated health care and implementation strategies; the importance of providing an array of effective mental health services and supports; early identification of mental health conditions and early intervention; the role of schools and colleges; and the development of social networking and related communication strategies. Ms. Gruttadaro serves on multiple national advisory groups, coalitions, and task forces and served as associate director of the SAMHSA-funded Technical Assistance Center for the Statewide Family Network grant program, which provided technical assistance to family-run organizations that improve the systems of care available to children, youth, and families in states across the country.

    Ann Hackman MD Dr. Hackman is an Associate Professor, Associate Residency Training Director, Senior Psychiatrist for RA1SE and Director of Community Psychiatry Training. She is also the Medical Director for the University of Maryland’s Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) team, where she has been working since the completion of her residency. She also serves on the Council for the Maryland Psychiatric Society and is part of the Anti-Stigma Project with On Our Own of Maryland. Dr. Hackman is interested in issues related to severe and chronic mental illness.

    Elliot Hong MD Dr. Hong is the Director of the First Episode Psychosis Clinic within the Maryland EIP Program. He is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Director of the University of Maryland Center for Brain Imaging Research, and Chief of the Neuroimaging Research Program at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. Dr. Hong's research interests include neurophysiology and functional MRI (fMRI) of individuals with schizophrenia.

    Karen McNamara PhD, MSW, LCSW-C Dr. McNamara has a broad background in project management, schizophrenia research, and more than five years’ experience in direct clinical care for individuals with First Episode Psychosis (FEP) and their families. She established a referral network of Maryland providers that encounter individuals experiencing FEP, and expanded this network as a part of the Recovery After and Initial Schizophrenia Episode (RAISE) Implementation and Evaluation Study (IES). As Outreach and Recruitment co-investigator on RAISE-IES she developed a knowledge base of successful outreach, referral, and early engagement strategies. Dr. McNamara also authored the NIMH manual on outreach, referral, and early engagement for individuals experiencing early psychosis.

    Meka McNeal Ms. McNeal is the statewide Evidence-Based Practice in Supported Employment (EBPSE) Consultant and Trainer for the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Evidence-Based Practice Center. Ms. McNeal's Supported Employment career began in 1998 as an Employment Specialist in Atlanta, GA, and in 2000 she became the coordinator for a supported employment program in New Carrollton, MD. Her role as the statewide trainer began in 2004. Ms. McNeal trains, provides technical assistance and monitors Supported Employment Programs in Maryland for how to implement EBPSE, and she provides training and technical assistance to other states around the country that are moving forward with their supported employment efforts.

    Gloria M. Reeves PhD Dr. Reeves is an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, specializing in family therapy interventions, attachment issues, complex psychiatric comorbidity, and trauma related disorders. Dr. Reeves’ research interests include childhood aggression, polypharmacy issues in child psychiatry, youth violence prevention, and neuroimaging. She completed the Sheppard Pratt Psychiatry Residency and Child Fellowship Training at University of Maryland at Baltimore. Her awards include a Ginsburg Fellowship, a Clarence Shultz Award, and a Eugene Brody Award.

    Whitney Reigel LCPC, CRC Whitney Reigel is a certified rehabilitation counselor and a licensed clinical professional counselor in the state of Maryland. She is the program supervisor of a Transition Age Youth Program, Career Academic-Psych-rehab Service, which provides supported employment, psychiatric rehabilitation, supported education, and outreach services to people with mental illness within Cornerstone Montgomery. Whitney has worked in the mental health field providing and overseeing services for six years. Whitney has worked as a supervisor and direct service specialist in an Evidence Based Practice Program.

    Jason Schiffman PhD Dr. Schiffman is a professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County where he runs the Youth First Lab dedicated to producing meaningful and useful research in the context of providing clinical services, while at the same time training future leaders in psychology. His areas of research include early identification and treatment of youth at risk for psychosis and reduction of stigma against people with serious mental health concerns. Dr. Shiffman’s research seeks to understand the origins of, and treatment for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders in children and young adults.

    Bette Stewart Over 25 years ago when Bette Stewart's husband was diagnosed with a mental illness, Stewart found her way to a support group run by the National Alliance on Mental Illness(NAMI). Her involvement with NAMI opened the door to a new career path in behavioral health. Bette has led and coordinated NAMI support groups, as well as NAMI’s evidence-based practice, Family-to-Family (FtF). She was a national and state FtF teacher trainer, past Executive Director of NAMI MD and is currently a consultant and trainer for the UMB Evidence-Based Practice Center.

    Johanne White LCSW-C Ms. White is a licensed certified clinical social worker and holds a master's degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She is the recovery coach (social skills trainer) with the RAISE Connection Program located in Carruthers Clinic, part of the Division of Community Psychiatry at the University of Maryland Medical Center. She provides therapy, leads participant groups, and coordinates the family support and education groups. Her experience includes family therapy, school-based mental health services, medical social work, psychiatric day hospital, in-patient and out-patient mental health care, and program administration with public and nonprofit agencies.

  • Mental Health to Support Student Learning: Training Modules for Educators and School-based Staff

    Nancy Lever PhD Dr. Lever is an associate professor as well as the co-director of the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She has been a driving force in advancing graduate and professional training related to school mental health and has coordinated training experiences for psychology interns, psychiatry fellows, postdoctoral fellows and SMHP staff. She serves as the Associate Director of the VA/University of Maryland Psychology Internship Consortium. Dr. Lever is the Director of two school mental health programs in Baltimore City.

    Dr. Lever has a particular focus on training, outreach, dissemination, and resource advancement, especially as it relates to promoting high-quality, evidence-based research, training, policy, and practice in school mental health. She oversees the content of the Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health, helps to facilitate the National Community of Practice on Collaborative School Behavioral Health, and represents the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) on local, state, and national committees. She has presented and written extensively about school mental health and is co-editor of the Handbook of School Mental Health.

    Sharon Hoover Stephan PhD Dr. Stephan is an associate professor of psychiatry as well as the co-director of the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The mission of the CSMH is to “Strengthen policies and programs in school mental health to improve learning and promote success for America’s youth.” To achieve that goal, the center supports research, disseminates policy information, provides training, and works to integrate the efforts of schools, researchers, community organizations, and government organizations to improve awareness of mental health issues. Dr. Stephan is experienced in establishing empirically supported intervention in schools, and she has a particular interest in interventions targeted at youth who have experienced traumatic events. She leads and participates in a variety of state- and federally-funded research projects aimed at assessing and improving school mental health services. Dr. Stephan is a national trainer for SSET and CBITS.

  • Mental Health Training Intervention for Health Providers in Schools (MH-TIPS)

    Nichole Bobo MSN, RN Ms. Bobo has been in the position of Director of Nursing Education at the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) for 14 years. She provides oversight for NASN's mental health programming, including the development, implementation, and evaluation of continuing education offerings for school nurses; acts as the liaison between NASN and multiple national partners; is an active participant on several national advisory boards; has co-authored several journal publications; and has been a contributor on several grant proposals.

    Nicole Cammack PhD Dr. Nicole Cammack currently serves as a clinical psychologist with the Army School Behavioral Health Program at Fort George G. Meade. She provides direct behavioral health treatment services to military connected children and their families in their natural school environment. She collaborates closely with a multi-disciplinary team of behavioral health providers, teachers, families, and other community supports to treat a wide range of mental health conditions and to improve continuity of care.

    Jill Haak Bohnenkamp PhD, MEd Dr. Bohnenkamp is an assistant professor and clinical psychologist in the Center for School Mental Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In this role she collaborates on a number of ongoing research projects and policy initiatives related to increasing and improving school-based mental health services. Dr. Bohnenkamp's research interests include promoting positive social and emotional development through teacher and parent training, evidence-based practices in school mental health, and increasing children's access to mental health services.

    Joyce Harrison MD Dr. Harrison is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Medical Director of the Maryland Behavioral Health Integration in Pediatric Primary Care. Dr. Harrison earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from Harvard University before attending medical school at Dartmouth University. She completed a pediatric internship in the Triple Board Program (pediatrics, adult psychiatry, and child psychiatry) at Tufts in Boston. Dr. Harrison completed her residency in adult psychiatry at the University of Maryland, in addition to a child psychiatry fellowship at Johns Hopkins University. At Johns Hopkins since 2002, Dr. Harrison has special interest and expertise in early childhood mental health, and community and school-based services.

    Sharon Hoover Stephan PhD Dr. Stephan is an associate professor of psychiatry as well as the co-director of the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The mission of the CSMH is to “Strengthen policies and programs in school mental health to improve learning and promote success for America’s youth.” To achieve that goal, the center supports research, disseminates policy information, provides training, and works to integrate the efforts of schools, researchers, community organizations, and government organizations to improve awareness of mental health issues. Dr. Stephan is experienced in establishing empirically supported intervention in schools, and she has a particular interest in interventions targeted at youth who have experienced traumatic events. She leads and participates in a variety of state- and federally-funded research projects aimed at assessing and improving school mental health services. Dr. Stephan is a national trainer for SSET and CBITS.

  • Interprofessional Training on Military Connected Families

    Dr. Kimberly Becker PhD Dr. Becker is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a licensed psychologist in the State of Maryland. Dr. Becker received a bachelor's degree in psychology from the College of William & Mary. She then completed her doctorate in psychology at the University of Arizona, a respecialization certificate in clinical psychology at the University of Hawaii, and postdoctoral fellowships at the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Becker's clinical experience and research have focused on improving the effectiveness of evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions for children, adolescents, and families through innovations in professional development. Through this work, Dr. Becker has collaborated with mental health providers, educators, and paraprofessionals to increase youth and family participation in services and enhance service quality across a variety of settings.

    Nicole Cammack PhD Dr. Nicole Cammack currently serves as a clinical psychologist with the Army School Behavioral Health Program at Fort George G. Meade. She provides direct behavioral health treatment services to military connected children and their families in their natural school environment. She collaborates closely with a multi-disciplinary team of behavioral health providers, teachers, families, and other community supports to treat a wide range of mental health conditions and to improve continuity of care.

    Mary Carol Chobany Carol Chobany is a native of Portage, Pennsylvania. She holds a bachelor's degree from the Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree from Loyola University, Baltimore, Maryland. Ms. Chobany was an elementary and middle school special education teacher in the Baltimore County (Maryland) Public Schools and went on to serve as principal at Patapsco Middle School, Howard County (Maryland) Public Schools, Ruth Parker Eason Special Education School, Anne Arundel County (Maryland) Public Schools, and Harford Hills Elementary School, Baltimore County (Maryland) Public Schools.

    Carol Chobany became the navy school liaison officer assigned to Naval Support Activity Annapolis in 2009. As a navy school liaison officer, Ms. Chobany serves as the primary link between the installation commander, military families, and the local schools. Ms. Chobany is an ex-officio member of the Maryland Commission for the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children (MIC3) and a member of the Maryland Military Special Education Coalition (M-SPEC) and the National Capital Region Joint School Liaison Coalition. (NCR-JSL).

    Kay Connors MSW, LCSW-C Ms. Connors has 30 years of experience as a clinical social worker working with traumatized children and their families. She has provided mental health treatment to children and families in a variety of settings including hospital, residential treatment, private practice, and clinic-, home-, and school-based programs. Her work has largely focused on the impact and recovery from trauma and family violence. Ms. Connors has directed programs, supervised staff, participated in outcome research as well as trained students and audiences locally and nationally. She is the project director for a SAMHSA funded program within the National Child Traumatic Stress Network-Family Informed Trauma Treatment Center and the program director of the Taghi Modarressi Center for Infant Study. Ms. Connors has also contributed to the scientific literature in child maltreatment serving as co-author on several peer-reviewed publications as well as co-authoring three chapters on group therapy with traumatized children and is a national trainer for Child-Parent Psychotherapy.

    Mary Gable Mary L. Gable serves as the assistant state superintendent for the Division of Academic Policy and Innovation for the Maryland State Department of Education. As assistant state superintendent, her major responsibilities include leadership for the development and support of policy related to state and federal education initiatives, including the provision of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the Maryland State Plan for Ensuring Equitable Access to Excellent Educators, and leadership of The Breakthrough Center, a program to provide support to Maryland's lowest performing schools. In addition, Mrs. Gable serves as Maryland's commissioner for the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children and is the chairperson of the Rules Committee for the Compact. Mrs. Gable holds an M.ED. in Educational Supervision and Administration from Loyola University Maryland.

    Francisco Jamison Francisco Jamison is the division chief for Fort Meade Child, Youth and School Services (CYS). Mr. Jamison began his Army CYS as a recreation aide in 1994 at Fort Story, V.A. In addition to his current position, he has held numerous positions throughout his 20+ year career including lead program assistant, school age care director, instructional programs specialist, youth center director, CYS administrator, and program operations specialist. Mr. Jamison's postsecondary education is in the Bachelor of Science Degree Program from Southern Illinois University. He is pursuing his master's degree in executive leadership.

    Mr. Jamison was a military dependent as his father proudly served for 22 years in the U.S. Army. Mr. Jamison grew up in Army CYS starting at the age of 5 in Youth Sports and continued to attend Army Youth Centers throughout his school years and adolescence.

    As the CYS division chief, Mr. Jamison oversees a large CYS program with four child development centers, two youth centers, one school age care center, youth sports and fitness program, and family child care homes. More than 350 staff members work for Meade CYS with an additional 175 volunteers and contractors. Meade CYS currently serves more than 5,500 children and youth annually.

    Dr. Dana Jones PhD Dana Jones, PhD, serves as a Regional Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Lead at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling, Washington, D.C. She is the EFMP subject matter expert for the region and oversees 1,600 military families who have dependents with developmental, behavioral and/or educational needs.

    Dr. Maisley Jones Paxton PhD Dr. Jones Paxton is a clinical psychologist and chief of the Child and Family Behavioral Health Service for the U.S. Army at Ft. Meade in Maryland. She directs the outpatient behavioral health clinic serving families of active duty service members and also leads the embedded behavioral health program in all seven schools, pre-K through grade 12, at Ft. Meade. Dr. Jones Paxton's areas of clinical interest include military families, treating post-traumatic stress disorder across the lifespan, suicide prevention and treatment, and integrating wellness promoting activities in behavioral health treatment.

    Dr. Jones Paxton earned her PhD from Catholic University in Washington, D.C., and also earned a master's degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a bachelor's degree from Wellesley College. Most of all, she is a working mother of two school-aged girls.

    Dr. Mary Keller EdD Dr. Mary M. Keller, president and CEO of the Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC), was one of the founders of the organization in 1998, which was created in response to the educational needs of military-connected children and youth. As an area superintendent, school administrator and K-12 as well as higher education professional for more than 21 years, Dr. Keller was uniquely positioned to witness the challenges military families faced in times of transition due to moves, deployment, or separation. Earning her doctorate from Texas Tech University, Dr. Keller holds several professional certifications, including superintendency, mid-management supervision and teacher education as well as a mediation certification from the Texas Bar Association. She is widely regarded as an expert on education issues related to the highly mobile military-connected student, and is routinely consulted for research-based findings used to address our military family needs.

    Nancy Lever PhD Dr. Lever is an associate professor as well as the co-director of the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She has been a driving force in advancing graduate and professional training related to school mental health and has coordinated training experiences for psychology interns, psychiatry fellows, postdoctoral fellows and SMHP staff. She serves as the Associate Director of the VA/University of Maryland Psychology Internship Consortium. Dr. Lever is the Director of two school mental health programs in Baltimore City.

    Dr. Lever has a particular focus on training, outreach, dissemination, and resource advancement, especially as it relates to promoting high-quality, evidence-based research, training, policy, and practice in school mental health. She oversees the content of the Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health, helps to facilitate the National Community of Practice on Collaborative School Behavioral Health, and represents the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) on local, state, and national committees. She has presented and written extensively about school mental health and is co-editor of the Handbook of School Mental Health.

    Dr. Jennifer Murano PsyD Jennifer Murano, PsyD, is a licensed psychologist at the UCLA Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior. She is the lead model supervisor for FOCUS, a family resilience program funded by the Office of Secretary of Defense, which serves active duty service members and their families at installations around the world. Dr. Murano is responsible for the training and supervision of all FOCUS employees in evidence-based prevention models for families, couples, and wounded warriors. She has led an initiative to improve support for wounded, ill, and injured service members and their families, which has been implemented across the FOCUS program. She has been a consultant for the Uniformed Services University-Health Sciences and the National Military Family Association. Her clinical and research interests include developing interventions for high-risk populations, family systems, and the vital role of forgiveness in emotional healing. Dr. Murano received her doctorate degree from the Institute for Psychological Sciences in Virginia.

    Ed Rothstein (COL Ret.) Ed Rothstein has led a diverse career during his 30-plus years with the military, including numerous deployments that included time in the Balkans, Iraq, and Afghanistan. In addition, later on his career he had the opportunity to study at Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy, along with working within the National Security Agency, among other jobs. Ed's last military assignment was garrison commander at Fort Meade in Maryland. Fort Meade is the home of the National Security Agency, Defense Information Systems Agency, USCYBERCOM, and more than 115 other organizations. With 53,000+ employees, Fort Meade is the largest single employer within Maryland.

    After retiring in 2014, he was appointed to be the economic developer for Anne Arundel County before founding ERA Advisory LLC. ERA Advisory LLC is a service-disabled veteran-owned small business (SDVOSB) focused on giving back to the community through business, marketing, and leadership development. As principal with ERA, Ed works with several businesses in the Baltimore-Washington area. In addition, Ed serves on multiple boards of directors within the region non-profit community, and on the local veteran's commission.

    Ed has an education degree from Lock Haven University, Pennsylvania, a master's degree in human resources from Webster University, St. Louis, Missouri, and a master’s degree in resource management from the Eisenhower School. At Lock Haven, Ed was a member of the Division I wrestling team and commissioned through the ROTC Program.

    Ed resides in Eldersburg, Maryland with his wife, Audrey, and two children, Emily and Sam. In his spare time, Ed enjoys running, golf, and other outdoor activities.

    Terri Tanielian Terri Tanielian is a senior social research analyst at the RAND Corporation. Her research interests include military and veteran health policy; military suicide; military sexual assault; and psychological and behavioral effects of combat, terrorism, and disasters. She employs quantitative and qualitative research methods and analyses in her work, including surveys, interviews, focus groups, and analysis of administrative data; as well as environmental scans of existing policies, programs and services. She formerly directed RAND's Center for Military Health Policy Research, overseeing RAND's diverse military health research portfolio. Tanielian was co-study director for RAND's seminal study Invisible Wounds of War: Psychological and Cognitive Injuries, Their Consequences, and Services to Assist Recovery (2008: RAND), the first non-governmental assessment of the psychological, emotional, and cognitive consequences of deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan. She was also the principal investigator for RAND's comprehensive study of military and veteran caregivers titled Hidden Heroes: America's Military Caregivers. She has conducted several needs assessments examining the challenges and issues facing veterans living in the Detroit Metropolitan Area, Massachusetts, and in New York State. She leads several other RAND studies including the Deployment Life Study, a prospective longitudinal study of military families across the deployment cycle. She also leads a study examining community-based models for expanding mental health care for returning veterans and their families under the Welcome Back Veterans Initiative. Tanielian has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and serves as an associate editor for Psychiatric Services. She has served on many advisory committees related to veteran mental health policy. Tanielian has a master's degree in psychology from the American University.

  • Peer Recovery Specialists - An Interprofessional Training

    Denise Camp ALWF, CPSST Denise Camp has had mental health issues since she was a child. Always a good student, she graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY, with a degree in biomedical engineering. Denise finally got a diagnosis of clinical depression, now called major depressive disorder, while working as an engineer for Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY. Denise continued to work as an engineer through her illness. However, symptoms and problems with her medications caused her to lose her engineering career while working for Honeywell's Aviation Systems Division in Phoenix, AZ. After some time back in Maryland, Denise began attending Prologue Inc., a psychiatric rehabilitation program (PRP) in Pikesville. After being on disability for more than a decade, Denise returned to work and is off all entitlements. After teaching computers at the PRP she used to attend, Denise became the director of Prologue's consumer program, the MARTYLOG Wellness and Recovery Center. After being affiliated with Prologue for more than a decade, Denise is now a training specialist and the WRAP project coordinator for On Our Own of Maryland, the state's consumer advocacy and education agency, is an advanced level Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) facilitator, a Certified Peer Support Specialist and trainer, serves as vice president of the Maryland Addictions and Behavioral-health Professionals Certification Board is secretary for the Board of Directors of Baltimore Crisis Response, is a commission on the Maryland Commission on Disabilities, and is a member of the Baltimore County Behavioral Health Advisory Council.

    Carroll Conquest RPS Carroll Conquest is a part-time consultant for the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD-MD) and a contractual trainer with Maryland's Behavioral Health Administration and Penn-North Community Resource Center. He is a Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) facilitator, an authorized trainer of the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR) Recovery Coach Academy, as well as an Intentional Peer Support (IPS) facilitator. He is a state Registered Peer Supervisor with the Maryland Addiction and Behavioral-health Professional Certification Board (MAPCB) and the former director of the Baltimore Recovery Corps. He was a peer recovery coach subject matter expert (SME) on the Job Tasks Analysis Committee for the International Certification & Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC), which developed the credentialing for Maryland's Certified Peer Recovery Specialist (CPRS) certification. He was a member of the Behavioral Health Administration's (BHA) BRSS TACS Policy Academy, which was responsible for guiding the roll-out of the Peer Certification statewide. In 2009, he completed the Partners for Recovery (PFR) and Addiction Technology Transfer Center's (ATTC) six-month Recovery Support Services Leadership Program. He was a participant in the development of the "Our Stories Have Power" recovery messaging training, CD for Faces and Voices of Recovery. In June 2012, he was a panelist on SAMHSA's "Road to Recovery" broadcast. He was a virtual presenter for Altarum Institute's 2016 Access to Recovery/RCSP-TCE-PTP on "Peer (Worker) Communication and Support Networks," and a 2016 presenter for SAMHSA's Block Grant Conference on "Promoting the Peer Workforce."

    Chelsea Dueitt Chelsea Dueitt is a person in long-term recovery from substance use disorder. She has been active in the field of recovery for the past three years. Chelsea works for White Deer Run Treatment Network, owned by Acadia Healthcare, as an alumni coordinator. Chelsea also serves as a volunteer for Voices of Hope for Cecil County, a nonprofit recovery community organization in Elkton, Maryland. Chelsea is currently enrolled in the bachelor of science in counseling program at Grand Canyon University and expects to complete her degree in December 2017. In her spare time, Chelsea enjoys reading, writing, scrapbooking, and boating on the Chesapeake.

    Carlton Hill CPRS Carlton Hill is a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist for the Frederick County Health Department. Previously, he interned at the Maryland Department of Corrections as a provisional counselor for five years.

    Mr. Hill received his Maryland counselor's license CSC-AC in 2015 and has a degree in human services. He also works as a part-time recovery house manager at the Frederick Rescue Mission. Mr. Hill is a person in long-term recovery.

    Brandee Izquierdo CPRS, RPS, CCAR-T, IPS-T Brandee Izquierdo is the director of the Office of Consumer Affairs for the State of Maryland's Behavioral Health Administration. She is also a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist and a Registered Peer Supervisor, offering lived experience for recovery and the criminal justice system. Brandee brings a well-rounded approach to recovery support services and is currently working toward her master's degree in public administration as a graduate student with the University of Baltimore, College Of Public Affairs. She serves as the chair of the Peer Subcommittee for the Maryland Addiction and Behavioral-health Professionals Certification Board and is a peer support subject matter expert for the International Certification & Reciprocity Consortium. Brandee has been featured on public television, has presented for national conferences, and has conducted national webinars speaking on recovery support services. Her passion about recovery and the benefits that come with it affords her the opportunity to engage communities and assist others in living productive and successful lives within recovery.

    Daphne Klein Daphne Klein is a business executive with 15 years of leadership experience in both corporate and nonprofit enterprise. She is a graduate of the Mentorship Program of the College for Behavioral Health Leadership, the executive director of On Our Own of Montgomery County, Inc., an advanced level WRAP facilitator, and an Intentional Peer Support trainer. She is a board member of the Montgomery County Mental Health Advisory Committee, the Montgomery County Mental Health Court Planning and Implementation Task Force, the Maryland Addiction and Behavioral-health Professional Certification Board, the CPRS Supervisor Peer Integrated Care Advisory Council of Maryland, and is working with the state of Maryland's Office of Consumer Affairs to develop the nation's first integrated forensic peer support curriculum.

    Lisa Pollard LPN Lisa Pollard is the behavioral health liaison for Carroll County Health Department, where she has been employed for almost 30 years. Lisa is a licensed practical nurse (LPN) who has worked as a multidisciplinary team member at several levels of care including residential treatment for substance use disorders, outpatient treatment for substance use disorders, outpatient detox, and inpatient behavioral health services at a local hospital.

    Santita Prather Santita Prather is the recovery supports coordinator with the Frederick County Health Department. She been working in the Behavioral Health Services Division since 2011. Santita has more than 20 years of work experience in the human services field. She earned a bachelor's degree in criminal justice from Old Dominion University. Santita serves on the board of directors for Frederick County's Mental Health Management Agency and the Substance Abuse Council. In her current role, she is the supervisor of the CORE Recovery Community Centers, MD Recovery Net Programs and Peer Support Programs for Frederick County.

    Santita is an organizer and facilitator in Frederick County for the nationally known CCAR Recovery Coach Academy. She is an approved supervisor with MAPCB to supervise Peer Recovery Support Specialists. Santita has also completed the Wellness Recovery Action Plan Facilitator training. In addition, she is the coordinator of the National Recovery Month events sponsored by the Frederick County Health Department.

    While employed with the health department, Santita has played an integral role in establishing recovery centers in Frederick County and peer support programs in Frederick Memorial Hospital, the Frederick County Adult Detention Center, Frederick County's Division of Parole and Probation and Adult Drug Treatment Court.

    Nicholas Reglein As a peer support specialist with the Overdose Survivors Outreach Services program, I meet participants with an opioid abuse disorder at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. My job is to meet with the participants wherever they may be in the hospital and assist them in their early recovery. We offer medication-assisted treatment, support services, community outreach, and resources. We will follow an individual for one year and continue to assist them in whichever way their recovery takes them, whether good or bad.

    Charlie Roe CPRS My recovery process started in January 1994. My anniversary date is August 27, 1994. I have been a member of a 12 step fellowship since that time and am well connected in the recovery community.

    I was offered an opportunity to gain employment in the peer recovery field March of 2012. After appropriate training and necessary requirements were met, I received my Peer Support Certification in early 2013 and have been in the role of Certified Peer Recovery Support Specialist since that time.

    My initial peer specialist role was with the Talbot Co. Addictions Program. I formed a partnership with Chesapeake Voyagers Wellness & Recovery Center in early 2013 to gain insight into the mental health world to better serve the community and peers as a whole. During that year, I also became a Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) facilitator and a peer recovery support trained supervisor.

    I have since gone on to acquire many additional trainings useful in the behavioral health field and gained a lot of hands on experience both at my present employ and in our community.

    I am employed with the Dorchester Co. Health Dept. at DRI-DOCK Recovery & Wellness Center. I work closely with our Dorchester Co. Addictions Program (DCAP) and many community partners in our area, along with other recovery and wellness centers, and am a board member with Chesapeake Voyagers, Inc.

    Stacia Smith Stacia Smith has been in the field of recovery support for 13 years. Her work has included everything from house manager and coordinator and outreach services coordinator to her current post as a peer support recovery specialist at the Carroll County Health Department Bureau of Prevention, Wellness and Recovery. She has received training in Connecticut Community for Addictions Recovery (CCAR), Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), and Leadership Empowerment Advocacy Project (LEAP) and is also in the process of becoming a certified peer recovery support specialist. Stacia enjoys participating in a variety of trainings to stay fresh in her field. She has attended several conferences such as Bereavement, Carroll Citizens for Racial Equality, and the National Conference on Tobacco and Behavioral Health. She has enjoyed being on the cusp of the changes in the recovery field, taking the holistic approach while moving from words like "recovery" to "wellness." Stacia began her journey of recovery in 2003 and it continues through today uninterrupted. She began the process of giving back and support in 2004, not knowing she would still be in the role 13 years later. Stacia is a true example that recovery is real and it's only through understanding and application that she finds it works. Seeing people "get one more day clean" is what makes Stacia passionate about her work. "Whether that one day leads to five years or 15 years, its celebrated one day at a time."

    Ellen Tippett Ellen Tippett grew up in Cecil County, MD. She has a younger sister and two loving parents and had a very happy childhood. She began using drugs and alcohol around age 15 and eventually progressed to heroin use. She got sober at age 24 and has been in recovery ever since. She now works for Harford County Health Department and is in school to become a social worker.

    Patrick Webb Patrick Webb is a person in long-term recovery, which to him, means he has not had any form of mind altering substance since March 15, 2013. Patrick currently works as a peer recovery advocate at the Cecil County health department. He also is the vice president on the board of directors of the nonprofit recovery advocacy group Voices of Hope for Cecil County. Patrick became interested in this field of work when a recovery mentor he met at a mutual support recovery meeting told him her vision of her nonprofit advocacy group (Voices of Hope). She told Patrick she was looking for volunteers and it would be a great way to give back to the community. Patrick began volunteering for Voices of Hope as an adolescent peer mentor, and as a part of that, was asked to volunteer in different adolescent groups at his local health department. After about a year and a half of volunteering, he became a full-time employee at the Cecil County Health Department as a peer recovery advocate, community health outreach worker. Today Patrick does mostly outreach work, which includes going to the local hospital, county jail, homeless day shelter and evening kitchen, and the local alternative school. As a peer, his job is to provide support to those in recovery or seeking recovery as well as provide resources and education. The thing he enjoys most about being a peer recovery advocate is having the ability to use his past experiences as a positive today and be a beacon of hope, as well as a friend to those who need it.

    Adelaide Weber CCAR-T Adelaide Weber is the coordinator of special programs with the Office of Consumer Affairs for the State of Maryland's Behavioral Health Administration. She is a recovery ally and a trainer for Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery's Recovery Coach Academy. Before her position with the Behavioral Health Administration, Adelaide worked with children and adolescents in an acute care mental health facility in Virginia for more than 12 years. She received her bachelor's of science in psychology from The Pennsylvania State University in 2000.

    Brendan Welsh CPRS Brendan Welsh works as the State Care Coordination program manager with the State of Maryland's Behavioral Health Administration, which is part of Maryland's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Prior to joining the Behavioral Health Administration, Brendan served as the recovery services manager with the Harford County Health Department for four years. During his time with the state, Brendan has worked throughout Maryland, providing ongoing trainings for behavioral health peers. His training library includes multiple training programs designed by the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR), the Copeland Center for Wellness and Recovery's Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP), the Danya Institute's Domain Training for Certified Peer Recovery Specialists, and the State of Maryland's Sexual Health in Recovery training program. Brendan is a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist (CPRS). The CPRS credential indicates that Brendan has completed intensive and ongoing training programs and has demonstrated the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities in the four identified domains to earn this designation as a leader in peer service delivery. Brendan established his personal recovery in February of 2011 and enjoys sharing the message of hope that comes from being in recovery with anyone who will listen.

    John Winslow MHS With more than 40 years of continuous recovery, John Winslow, MHS, is coordinator of the Maryland chapter of the National Council on Alcoholism & Drug Dependence's Recovery Leadership Program. He is also past president of the Maryland Addictions Directors Council (MADC) and until retiring from state service served as director of the Dorchester County Addictions Program and oversaw the DRI-DOCK Recovery & Wellness Center in Cambridge, Maryland. John has been an active participant to statewide public policy agendas and in his recovery advocacy role provides critical information to legislative committees in Annapolis related to professional issues in the overall treatment and recovery system.

  • Pediatric Psychopharmacology

    Mark Riddle MD Dr. Riddle's research, teaching, and clinical practice focuses on pediatric psychopharmacology, especially medication side effects. He is a member of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development-sponsored Data Monitoring Board for the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and as a member of the Primary Pediatric Psychopharmacology Steering Committee of the REACH Institute.

  • Community-Partnered School Behavioral Health Implementation Modules

    Prerna Arora PhD Dr. Arora is an assistant professor of psychology at Pace University. Dr. Arora's primary research interests focus on the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices in school and community settings for underserved youth and adolescents. Specifically, using mixed methodology and participatory research methods, Dr. Arora is interested in the adaptation of evidence-based practices for diverse and underserved populations, barriers to uptake of evidence-based practices, and supporting the implementation of psychosocial interventions in pediatric primary care sites. Dr. Arora has additional interests in the interface of research with policy, international psychology, and in school mental health generally.

    Elizabeth Connors PhD Dr. Elizabeth Connors is a Research Associate with the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Connors completed her predoctoral psychology internship at the VA Maryland Health Care System/University of Maryland Baltimore Psychology Consortium within the School Mental Health track. Her research and clinical training have focused on improving access to and quality of mental health care for underserved children and families. Dr. Connors' current research interests include the dissemination, implementation, and program evaluation of evidence-based mental health services for children and families receiving care in school and community-based settings. She has presented at national conferences and co-authored manuscripts on a variety of topics, including the school mental health clinician perspectives on evidence-based treatments and assessment, role of nurses, psychiatrists and primary care providers in school mental health, integration of mental health and education research agendas, and evaluation research on other community-based clinical services such as treatment foster care, psychiatric residential treatment, wraparound services, and specialty care for transition age youth and young adults.

    Kay Connors MSW, LCSW-C Ms. Connors has 30 years of experience as a clinical social worker working with traumatized children and their families. She has provided mental health treatment to children and families in a variety of settings including hospital, residential treatment, private practice, and clinic-, home-, and school-based programs. Her work has largely focused on the impact and recovery from trauma and family violence. Ms. Connors has directed programs, supervised staff, participated in outcome research as well as trained students and audiences locally and nationally. She is the project director for a SAMHSA funded program within the National Child Traumatic Stress Network-Family Informed Trauma Treatment Center and the program director of the Taghi Modarressi Center for Infant Study. Ms. Connors has also contributed to the scientific literature in child maltreatment serving as co-author on several peer-reviewed publications as well as co-authoring three chapters on group therapy with traumatized children and is a national trainer for Child-Parent Psychotherapy.

    Dana Cunningham PhD Dr. Cunningham graduated from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale with a doctoral degree in clinical psychology. Following the completion of her internship at the University of Maryland Medical System/Maryland Veterans Administration Consortium, she completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for School Mental Health. In 2006, she joined the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Cunningham is the Director of the Prince George's School Mental Health Initiative (PGSMHI). The PGSMHI is designed to provide intensive school-based counseling and support services to students in special education. Dr. Cunningham's research interests include resilience, family engagement, and empirically supported treatment for ethnic minority youth.

    Elizabeth Freeman Elizabeth Freeman provides technical assistance to Safe Schools Healthy Student grantees at AIR. She is a licensed clinical social worker with over 25 years extensive experience providing clinical mental health/behavioral health, substance abuse, co-occurring disorders, trauma and treatment interventions for children, youth and families in community and school settings. Freeman has worked in community mental health, schools, pre/post adoption services, early childhood settings, juvenile justice intervention programs, nonprofit and advocacy agencies, and faith-based community counseling services. Ms. Freeman also brings extensive administrative experience in building collaborations among community groups, utilizing evidence-based practices, and implementing systems level change to improve and expand mental health services in schools for children and families. Prior to her work at AIR, she was the state director for school mental health services for the South Carolina Department of Mental Health where she provided leadership to obtain federal and state grants to develop over 500 school mental health programs across SC from 1996-2007, and served as principal investigator on federal and state grants.

    Nancy Lever PhD Dr. Lever is an associate professor as well as the co-director of the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She has been a driving force in advancing graduate and professional training related to school mental health and has coordinated training experiences for psychology interns, psychiatry fellows, postdoctoral fellows and SMHP staff. She serves as the Associate Director of the VA/University of Maryland Psychology Internship Consortium. Dr. Lever is the Director of two school mental health programs in Baltimore City.

    Dr. Lever has a particular focus on training, outreach, dissemination, and resource advancement, especially as it relates to promoting high-quality, evidence-based research, training, policy, and practice in school mental health. She oversees the content of the Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health, helps to facilitate the National Community of Practice on Collaborative School Behavioral Health, and represents the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) on local, state, and national committees. She has presented and written extensively about school mental health and is co-editor of the Handbook of School Mental Health.

    Billina R. Shaw MD

    Dr. Billina Shaw is a board certified adult psychiatrist as well as a board certified child and adolescent psychiatrist. She is the child and adolescent psychiatrist for the University of Maryland Child Program for Assertive Community Treatment, a mobile treatment program serving children and their families in Baltimore city. She also teaches and supervises adult psychiatry residents and child and adolescent psychiatry fellows.

    Dr. Shaw received many institutional awards for her dedication to cultural competence and public sector psychiatry. In 2011, she was awarded the American Psychiatric Association Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) fellowship. She used the fellowship funds to travel to Nairobi, Kenya to do psychiatric consultation to the University of Maryland Institute of Human Virology program. She also served as Chief Resident of the University of Maryland Psychiatric Emergency Services.

    Sharon Hoover Stephan PhD Dr. Stephan is an associate professor of psychiatry as well as the co-director of the Center for School Mental Health (CSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The mission of the CSMH is to “Strengthen policies and programs in school mental health to improve learning and promote success for America’s youth.” To achieve that goal, the center supports research, disseminates policy information, provides training, and works to integrate the efforts of schools, researchers, community organizations, and government organizations to improve awareness of mental health issues. Dr. Stephan is experienced in establishing empirically supported intervention in schools, and she has a particular interest in interventions targeted at youth who have experienced traumatic events. She leads and participates in a variety of state- and federally-funded research projects aimed at assessing and improving school mental health services. Dr. Stephan is a national trainer for SSET and CBITS.

    Tierra Sydnor-Diggs LGSW Mrs. Tierra Sydnor-Diggs is a licensed social worker who has spent her career working with children and families providing direct and indirect clinical services. She is currently employed with the University of Maryland School of Medicine as a School Transition Specialist and a Clinical Supervisor. She is a certified group facilitator for the Strengthening Families Program, Strengthening Families Coping Resources Program and Circle of Security. Mrs. Sydnor-Diggs provides public education and awareness about mental health and community resources. She also conducts trainings and provides professional consultation on topics related to specific mental health diagnoses and treatments, parenting, school-based behavioral health, and family and community engagement techniques.

  • Sexual Abuse Awareness and Prevention

    Tom Dolan Tom Dolan has been a faculty member of the Office of Education and Training for Addiction Services (OETAS) at the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration since 1987. He has customized workshops for various Maryland state government departments and authored counselor training curricula including Screening/Assessment and Diagnoses, Treatment Planning, Stages of Change and Motivational Interviewing, Crisis Intervention, and Clinical Supervision courses. He also provided addiction treatment program reviews as a consultant to the administration. Tom has presented more 190 multi-day workshops. He has trained for the Danya Institute, the Federal Department of Justice, the Veterans Administration, and the National Certification Reciprocity Consortium. He has provided consultation, assessment, and training services to a number of private agencies including Catholic Charities, Adoptions Together, Health Care for the Homeless and Hollander Counseling Services. He worked for the Mental Health and Addictions EAP provider for the Baltimore City Police and participated in annual in-service training for the department. Tom holds a bachelor's degree in art education from Towson University and two graduate certificates: Loyola College, Substance Abuse Counseling; and Tai Sophia Institute, Transformational Leadership and Social Change.

  • The Maryland Youth Care Coordinator Training Series

    Lindsey Weekley MS, LCPC Lindsey Weekley is a Care Coordination Program Manager with the Center for Children, Inc. She has over 8 years of experience providing Care Coordination services to families and supervision to care coordinators. Her passion is community-based work and helping children and their families through the systems of care approach. Lindsey is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC). She has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Clemson University and earned her Master’s degree in Clinical Community Counseling from Johns Hopkins University.